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post #101 of 136
I remember studying the Beloved novel as part of my English degree's steady program of giving me the tools to thoroughly despise novels!
post #102 of 136
Thread Starter 
The only Morrison novel I've read is SULA.

I don't really remember it.
post #103 of 136
Paradise has the best opening line of any novel.

Second is The Gunslinger.
post #104 of 136
post #105 of 136
Thread Starter 
The best opening line of a novel belongs to Walker Percy's LOVE IN THE RUINS:

"Now in these dread latter days of the old violent beloved U.S.A. and of the Christ-forgetting Christ-haunted death-dealing Western world I came to myself in a grove of young pines and the question came to me: has it happened at last?"
post #106 of 136
Better than 'Call me Ishmael.'??
post #107 of 136
There is no greater hook than, "They shoot the white girl first."
post #108 of 136
Thread Starter 
Both are great, but I'm sticking by Percy.
post #109 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Agentsands77 View Post

I crave those cinematic moments where movies almost feel as though they've been possessed by some supernatural force, offering a glimpse of something elemental or primal or transcendent.

One of the reasons I'm drawn to cinematic expressionism/surrealism is that it suggests the ineffable better than naturalism can.

 

 

Quite possibly my favorite single modern movie scene. It doesn't hurt that I walk through this space twice a day every weekday. If only it was as grand as this in reality!

 

Also, thanks again for the gift exchange Criterion of this, Fraid!

post #110 of 136
Thread Starter 
I'm probably due for FISHER KING rewatch. In fact, I haven't seen any Gilliam films in while.
post #111 of 136
I hate to admit it but I'm not really a fan of Gilliam. I just can't ever connect with most of his work. I think I liked Fear and Loathing most if that tells you anything..
post #112 of 136
Thread Starter 
There are films that can play a big role in the development of your taste and attitudes, but fade in importance later on.

When I saw it in 2009, I Am Love was everything to me.

It still is a tremendously impressive film by any reasonable measure. That glorious cinematography, the astonishing John Adams music (it was my introduction to his amazing work), the fearless Tilda performance.

I fell in love with it so much that it made me want to discover the films that inspired it, the melodramas of Sirk and Visconti. And so I did.

Those movies are more robust and profound than I Am Love, which has seemed somewhat sillier and thinner with time. I rewatched it not long ago and found that I merely liked it.

Tarantino has been much the same way. Once I became infatuated by the films that inspired his work, I fell out of love with him a little bit.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fraid uh noman View Post

I hate to admit it but I'm not really a fan of Gilliam. I just can't ever connect with most of his work. I think I liked Fear and Loathing most if that tells you anything..
I still adore Brazil.

Zero Theorem is underrated.
post #113 of 136
Unless I'm forgetting something, his output quality has been steadily downhill since, what? 12 Monkeys?

Which is still great.
post #114 of 136

His later stuff tends to feel insular and compromised by increasingly cramped budgets. For all the tales of him butting heads with studios, he tends to be at his best when he's given a decent budget but kept on a short enough leash to give the storytelling some discipline, like on Fisher King and 12 Monkeys.

 

Dr Parnassus is somewhat underrated though.

post #115 of 136
Thread Starter 
As noted above, I really liked The Zero Theorem and think it's the best of Gilliam's post-Loathing work.

It's certainly a minor film, but it has its clever bits (including the best of all Matt Damon cameos), and is admirably tender in its presentation of existential struggle.
post #116 of 136
Barting up the place, here's my top 10 favorite books!

Catch-22
Slaughterhouse-Five
The Gunslinger
Neuromancer
Snow Crash
Huck Finn
House of Leaves
The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay
Already Dead (Joe Pitt Casebooks)
The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
post #117 of 136
Thread Starter 
Decent amount of snob cred there, Bart! I love SNOW CRASH and NEUROMANCER, too.

I can't really do a top ten books list. It changes too much. That's why I listed authors earlier.

If I were to list out my favorite book for each:

Roberto Bolaño (2666)
Jorge Luis Borges (COLLECTED FICTIONS)
Ray Bradbury (DANDELION WINE)
Anthony Burgess (EARTHLY POWERS)
Raymond Chandler (THE LONG GOODBYE)
Umberto Eco (THE ISLAND OF THE DAY BEFORE)
James Ellroy (THE BIG NOWHERE)
Patricia Highsmith (RIPLEY UNDER GROUND)
Vladimir Nabokov (LOLITA)
Walker Percy (LANCELOT)
post #118 of 136
Read a lot of Chandler and Eco. They are the goods.

My reading tastes are a little more refined because of my master's in literature.

You should see my taste in theater. That's where I'm pretentious.
post #119 of 136
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bartleby_Scriven View Post

Read a lot of Chandler and Eco. They are the goods.
I was depressed when Eco passed away. I wish he was around to comment on our current situation, given his knowledge of and fascination with fascism.

His last novel, NUMERO ZERO, was light but prescient.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bartleby_Scriven View Post

My reading tastes are a little more refined because of my master's in literature.
I have a B.A. in lit. I didn't go on to pursue it further (I got kinda sick of academia and haven't seriously looked back since.)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bartleby_Scriven View Post

You should see my taste in theater. That's where I'm pretentious.
Do tell.
Edited by Agentsands77 - Yesterday at 10:53 am
post #120 of 136

All right, let me see. I tend to gravitate towards absurdist and metatheater.

 

Trying to nail this down to authors and/or plays:

 

Samuel Beckett - Waiting for Godot specifically, but Not I and Krapp's Last Tape

Tom Stoppard - Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead and Arcadia

David Mamet - Glengarry Glen Ross certainly, but Oleanna in particular

Paula Vogel's How I Learned to Drive

Sartre's No Exit

Pirandello's Six Characters in Search of an Author

Ibsen's A Doll's House

Susan Glaspell's Trifles

Marsha Norman's 'night, Mother

and my favorite might be David Henry Hwang's M. Butterfly

post #121 of 136
Boy, y'all got me beat. I have zero interest in theater..
post #122 of 136
Thread Starter 
I've not invested the money to really become a theater guy, but I like my fair share of plays (I loved reading Arcadia).

I'm more of an opera guy. Favorite operas:

AKHNATEN (Glass)
BORIS GODUNOV (Mussorgsky)
DON CARLO (Verdi)
LULU (Berg)
MADAMA BUTTERFLY (Puccini)
THE MAKROPULOS CASE (Janacek)
SALOME (Strauss)
IL TABARRO (Puccini)
TOSCA (Puccini)
WUTHERING HEIGHTS (Herrmann)
post #123 of 136
The closest I've ever come to theater was the Batman Stunt Show at Six Flags.

Things I've learned today:
Bart is MUCH more intellectually refined than I am..
post #124 of 136
I don't know a ton about opera. I'm actually more familiar with ballet and Broadway! But being familiar with Madama Butterfly is key to understanding M. butterfly, so I saw it for that.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fraid uh noman View Post

The closest I've ever come to theater was the Batman Stunt Show at Six Flags.

Things I've learned today:
Bart is MUCH more intellectually refined than I am..

Nah. I prefer beer to wine. Although I do love a good cab sav.
post #125 of 136
Thread Starter 
I've had bad experiences with ballet.

I wasn't a big opera guy until after I got married and my wife and I started taking regular trips to the Met.

And, as I'm sure everyone here knows, I'm a big wine drinker. I also enjoy the occasional spirit (Scotch or Cognac) or cocktail (Negroni or a gin martini).
post #126 of 136
Ballet in and of itself would be a bad experience for me..
post #127 of 136
I have no dancing or singing skills, and yet I love to watch others dance and sing.
post #128 of 136
I applaud others dancing and singing skills if they're successful at it and it's their passion and brings them pleasure. And I'll go to an event to see someone dance/sing if they personally ask me and want me to see them and I'll act interested in it as all hell for their sake and to make them feel good about themselves but I would never ever just go watch that stuff on my own..
post #129 of 136
Thread Starter 
I have a background in classical music (I am a classical vocalist; I actually met my wife through our voice teacher), so I've always been drawn to this stuff to some degree. Even so, I didn't really develop a deep love for classical repetoire until after I'd left school.

With ballet, I generally don't connect with the dancing. I'd prefer concert presentations of the ballet scores. (That said, I've always wanted to attend a fully-staged production of "The Rite of Spring.")
post #130 of 136
I respect ALL art forms. I enjoy people being passionate about anything like that. I like discussing things that people are passionate about. Any and all of it. I just wish I loved it all. But alas..
post #131 of 136

I produced theatre for ten years. 

 

 

I hate theatre.

post #132 of 136
I've reviewed musical theater and stage plays for local newspapers for the last six years.

I love theater.
post #133 of 136
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bartleby_Scriven View Post

I've reviewed musical theater and stage plays for local newspapers for the last six years.

I love theater.
Sweet gig.
post #134 of 136

I hate musical theatre most of all.

post #135 of 136
Just freelance. And not nearly as often as I used to!

But free tickets!

I cover the Fringe Festival here in Cincinnati every June, so there's that to look forward to.
post #136 of 136
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bartleby_Scriven View Post

But free tickets!
That alone makes it worth it.
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