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The Star Trek Thread - Page 111

post #5501 of 5563

I can't speak for all Trekkies, but I caught these episodes in their first run and I mainly remember being bored witless by the repeated forays into Klingon politics. But I know that black viewers found representation in Worf, and by association the Klingons, early and passionately.

post #5502 of 5563

I got quite invested in the Klingon plotline actually. I remember being quite taken in by the story of Worf's honor and his revenge against Duras. The politics was silly and cheesy, but effective to me.

 

Alexander on the other hand, really needed to step out of an airlock.

post #5503 of 5563

Didn't Data kind of have two arcs? One with his "sibling rivalry" with Lore, and his quest to become more Human?

post #5504 of 5563
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cylon Baby View Post
 

Didn't Data kind of have two arcs? One with his "sibling rivalry" with Lore, and his quest to become more Human?

 

The moment Stocks mentioned about the fact Worf was the only one with an ongoing plot, I immediately thought of Data and was all ready to pounce with an AHA! But on reflection...

 

The Human Quest never really went anywhere, just occasionally caused a kerfuffle of the week when he made a daughter or installed an emotion chip or something. He always reset at the end of every episode. As a character, he never really altered until the movies.

 

Lore (and Soong) was more of an ongoing storyline, wherein you needed some knowledge of former episodes to really get the context, but the context was really just "This is Data's Evil Twin". He was no more valid a story than the Borg in the sense that he's just a monster of the week. History is nice in those cases, but not essential to fully enjoy the episode.

 

Worf had quite a detailed little plotline that did involve a bit of a recap every time it was brought up. For something as syndicate friendly as ST:TNG, it was pretty advanced.

 

I got the feeling they wanted to do this, Riker had his Daddy issues, Picard had a love interest that could have gone somewhere, Troi had her Mother and the hint of family responsibilities, Riker/Troi is probably the only other thing that possibly compares and I don't think that went anywhere until the very end of the show.

post #5505 of 5563
Thread Starter 
Funny thing about the Lore deal is that by this point he was actually dead. "Datalore" ended with Wesley dissolving Lore via transporter "Lore's gone, sir. Permanently." There's no mention of beaming him off into space and leaving him behind. That would have been incredibly irresponsible of Picard to just leave him floating out there like that (then again, it was season one Picard). It's not until "Brothers" that it's retconned to make him live.

I actually forgot of it, but you could call probably call that an ongoing story by "Brothers", only barely since he only pops up one more time. I don't think they really had an idea of where to go at this point with him, and it wouldn't be until another three years that he returns.
post #5506 of 5563
Thread Starter 
Whee, still here.

Nice try Bart.
post #5507 of 5563

Yeah, one of those nights where I'm wondering if it'd be worth it to spend the rest of my life reconstructing my post history...

post #5508 of 5563
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Stockslivevan View Post

Funny thing about the Lore deal is that by this point he was actually dead. "Datalore" ended with Wesley dissolving Lore via transporter "Lore's gone, sir. Permanently." There's no mention of beaming him off into space and leaving him behind. That would have been incredibly irresponsible of Picard to just leave him floating out there like that (then again, it was season one Picard). It's not until "Brothers" that it's retconned to make him live.

I actually forgot of it, but you could call probably call that an ongoing story by "Brothers", only barely since he only pops up one more time. I don't think they really had an idea of where to go at this point with him, and it wouldn't be until another three years that he returns.

 

 

I had no idea. I guess Wesley screwed up THAT ASSHOLE!

post #5509 of 5563
I started watching "Star Trek: The Animated Series." Apart from Chekov being replaced by what looks like a Gungan with a degenerative disorder, I'm digging it quite a bit. The animation isn't exactly eye popping. But it still feels very Star Trek.
post #5510 of 5563
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradito View Post

I started watching "Star Trek: The Animated Series." Apart from Chekov being replaced by what looks like a Gungan with a degenerative disorder, I'm digging it quite a bit. The animation isn't exactly eye popping. But it still feels very Star Trek.

No. I can't believe what you've done.
post #5511 of 5563
Thread Starter 
"Allegiance"

Fun prisoner ep, especially the ending where Picard is simply BOSS. The impostor Picard stuff is fun too. It's amusing that for once Picard comes onto Ten Forward, has ale with everyone and starts singing a drinking song, and the reaction by the characters is dread "that's not the Captain", they know Picard is too much of a stick in the mud to have fun like his impostor!

"Captain's Holiday"

Aka: Picard Gets Laid.

It's a fun lark of an episode where we get to see Picard let loose, even as he tries to defy it in the beginning. I even like the callback to TOS's "Shore Leave" where a character reports an officer that is under too much stress to work, only Picard instantly catches on that trick unlike Kirk. Also again solidifying the Ferengi less as a menace and more of a nuisance. Vash works as a love interest for Picard because she also works as a foil, someone to provoke him and his stodgy attitude and he can't get enough of it, and I can't either.
post #5512 of 5563
Thread Starter 
"Tin Man"

May have one of my favorite TNG scores, with Chattaway on his first gig before Berman told him to turn the music into wallpaper. Aside from that, it's a pretty okay episode. Do love the ending with Troi and Data.


"Hollow Pursuits"

Another episode that discredits Gene's "all humans are perfect" fixation with Barclay being a total social misfit. It's also a good example technobabble done right where it's not about the tech but about Barclay coming out of his shell and working with the crew to get shit done. This episode is also a good indicator of where Picard and Riker have come at this point. Picard in the early seasons was typically stern, but now has become more easy going, trying to make Barclay more comfortable with his assignment. Riker, commanding wise, has become more stern like Picard used to be. This kind of switch is good timing for when the S3 finale comes up it reaches that point whether Riker is finally ready for the big chair.
post #5513 of 5563
Thread Starter 
"The Most Toys"

Definitely among my favorites of the season primarily because of Saul Rubinek, who amazingly got into the role at the last minute that it's effortless, making it among my favorite villains in all Trek. Another step for Data into becoming more human is his little lie, and did he actually mean to gloat at the end at the brig or is that how we could interpret it?


"Sarek"

Kind of amazing this episode even happened because apparently Berman was heavily in his "no references to TOS" phase, despite doing this episode (and Ira Behr having a long debate with Berman over wanting to mention Spock's name*). It could have been about any random ambassador guest star going through aging, but bringing back Sarek was a great touch in that it can allow long time Trekkies to become more involved in this because it's tapping into a cherished TOS character.

*= Picard actually mentions attending "Sarek's son's wedding", again Spock's name not being mentioned in this bit moment because Berman was weird about referencing TOS.
post #5514 of 5563

post #5515 of 5563
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Stockslivevan View Post

"The Most Toys"

Definitely among my favorites of the season primarily because of Saul Rubinek, who amazingly got into the role at the last minute that it's effortless, making it among my favorite villains in all Trek. Another step for Data into becoming more human is his little lie, and did he actually mean to gloat at the end at the brig or is that how we could interpret it?


"Sarek"

Kind of amazing this episode even happened because apparently Berman was heavily in his "no references to TOS" phase, despite doing this episode (and Ira Behr having a long debate with Berman over wanting to mention Spock's name*). It could have been about any random ambassador guest star going through aging, but bringing back Sarek was a great touch in that it can allow long time Trekkies to become more involved in this because it's tapping into a cherished TOS character.

*= Picard actually mentions attending "Sarek's son's wedding", again Spock's name not being mentioned in this bit moment because Berman was weird about referencing TOS.

Spock gets married at some point?

post #5516 of 5563
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bartleby_Scriven View Post

Spock gets married at some point?

It's a throwaway line, but yeah. And it looks like that line served as the basis for a EU novel "Vulcan's Heart", which has Spock and Saavik getting married.
post #5517 of 5563
Kirstie Alley or Robin Curtis version?
post #5518 of 5563
Thread Starter 
Going by this cover...





Really though, fuck this cover.
post #5519 of 5563
Da fuh
post #5520 of 5563
There's something tremendously skeevy about authors pairing Spock up with substantially younger Vulcan women who he outranks, whether in this dubious novel (which I've not read), or in the scene where Spock holds the glass that Lieutenant Valeris drinks out of in Star Trek 6.
post #5521 of 5563
Thread Starter 
It already got skeevy in SEARCH FOR SPOCK when she helps him with his pon farr, so of course authors take it further by expanding on that and tying it with a line Picard said in TNG.

To be honest, it wasn't until recently that I realized Picard was alluding to Spock's wedding. The line is treated so matter of fact and inconsequentially that I didn't really notice it for a long time. I probably just assumed Picard was referring to Sarek's second marriage or something.
post #5522 of 5563
Poor Saavik. It was probably a relief when the Klingons showed up on the Genesis planet and gave her an excuse to take a break from jacking Spock off.
post #5523 of 5563
I'm pretty sure the reason Saavik stayed on Vulcan in Trek 4 was she was supposedly pregnant with Spock's child from said Pon Far even in Trek 3. But that scene/line/whatever was cut from the final version of the film.

It would not surprise me in the least bit if Saavik is the Checkov replacement in nu-Trek 4.

Anyway...watching Trek 5 on HBO Family. It's bad for sure but it's almost cheesy enough to be good. Give it another pass through the editing bay and it might be decent. Certainly no worse than Generations.
Edited by Paul755 - 1/25/17 at 8:27pm
post #5524 of 5563

Decent FX alone would help V immeasurably.

post #5525 of 5563
What does God need with an effects budget?
post #5526 of 5563
I dunno. I'm actually ok with the sketchy effects. It's TOS level in movie form.

"What does God need with a Starship" is still one of my favorite Kirk lines.
post #5527 of 5563
The vision of Spock's pain always bugged me. Wouldn't Sarek have known that his half-human son would be half-human? He seems bafflingly disappointed.
post #5528 of 5563

Especially if you subscribe to Roddenberry's unnervingly detailed account of what it takes to birth a half-Vulcan half-human (look it up, I'll wait). Sarek would have to have been all-in.

post #5529 of 5563
Thread Starter 
I've read about Roddenberry's comments on Ferengi having various specific sex positions, I don't need to read more.
post #5530 of 5563

I've always found it amusing Sarek doesn't make it through a single episode of televised live-action Trek* without a serious health crisis.

 

*"Yesteryear" from TAS avoids the trope.

post #5531 of 5563
FINAL FRONTIER is god-awful, but it's still fun. I'll take it above any of those fucking TNG movies.
post #5532 of 5563
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Episode29 View Post

I've always found it amusing Sarek doesn't make it through a single episode of televised live-action Trek* without a serious health crisis.

*"Yesteryear" from TAS avoids the trope.

I guess we should brace ourselves for when DISCOVERY brings him in.

"Sarek will be boarding."
"Aw shit, better go on yellow alert."
post #5533 of 5563
Thread Starter 
"Ménage à Troi"

Yuck.

Only good part is that Wesley ditches his stupid grey onesie for a red uniform as a full ensign.

"Transfigurations"

The X-Men episode. Also the one where Geordi finally gets laid with the girl that put him in the friend zone way back in "Booby Trap". The guest alien is pretty bland, mostly because of the guest actor playing, so I never really care so much about his whole deal. The only good parts I like are when Data and Geordi are at Ten Forward spouting technobabble, which is annoys Worf because he only came to drink.

"The Best of Both Worlds"

Yeah, we know all about this one. It's great and all. Hey, look, conflict among Starfleet crew with Riker and Shelby butting heads. Gene must have been asleep again.


Season Three Summary:

Quite a shift after the turbulent first two seasons. As I've said in another post, it's nice to actually have more focus on the characters, or at least put more emphasis on them. A Troi episode like "The Price" is at least a much more admirable attempt at getting into her character than something like "Haven" in S1. In the earlier episode, she's mostly treated as this prize for the male characters, whereas in the S3 episode she's confronted with her hypocritical views regarding the ethics of using empathic powers in situations to get an upper hand.

The one upside of Dr. Crusher coming back is that Gates McFadden's acting has improved since the first season. Like Pulaski she's mostly resorted to medical jargon, but occasionally gets some nice character moments, usually shown through her relationship with other characters like Wesley or Picard, which is so few. Of course, she'll never really get the kind of attention more popular characters get, so this is as good as it gets.

Despite getting a promotion close to the end of S3, Wesley seemed to have much less to do this time, which only added to Wheaton's desire to leave the series. Kind of ironic, given the season started out with a Wesley show.

Geordi at some point turned into a full on nerd. He always was, but in the early seasons he seemed much more laid back and humorous, whereas by this season he's more awkwardly social, especially with women. Not so much of a spunky wisecracker anymore. As usual, what makes him likable is mostly LeVar Burton's mere presence, and his genuine chemistry with Brent Spiner is still strong during the Data and Geordi scenes.

Worf gets a lot more attention this time, whether it's an episode about him or he has a b-story. "Sins of the Father" would typically be cited among fans as a highlight, but I really love his b-story in "The Enemy" the most, where he flat out refuses to help a dying Romulan. He'll learn human ways of doing things, but he still grew up as a Klingon.

Data, as usual, gets the most attention. "The Offspring" is probably the best of the Data episodes this season, but it's also kind of a riff on "The Measure of a Man", so I'd actually feel more inclined to name "The Most Toys" the best as it's just as good an example of Data proving there's more to him.

Riker - If there was a time for Riker to be captain, this probably should have been the moment at the end of "The Best of Both Worlds". Like Kirk, he can be much more casual with his subordinates, yet become stern when required. It's gonna be hard after this season to move forward and look at Riker without thinking "what are you still doing here?" He didn't get to do as much heroics as the first two seasons, as Patrick Stewart demanded more to do than stand around on a bridge.

Picard - Ira Behr calls "The Best of Both Worlds" the moment Picard regained his humanity. I'd argue it happened a bit earlier, but definitely around this season. In the first season he was especially stern to the point that you'd suspect he had contempt for those around him. By the second season he eased up a bit, though would occasionally play up that grumpy act again like in "Samaritan Snare". What also adds to that is Riker often was the hero of the show in the first two seasons, leaving Picard at the bridge. This kept up that image of him being aloof. With this season, he's stepping out more and getting involved with his crew, and it helps that we get to see him let loose like in "Captain's Holiday", or even his awkward double in "Allegiance"

All that said about Picard, I wonder how the show would have turned out if he did get killed in BOBW. These first three seasons would have been all we got to know of him, and Riker becoming captain would change the dynamic from here on. In a way, it does feel set up. Not intentional, but there was this pupil/mentor dynamic between Riker and Picard that in retrospect feels like it built up to the S3 finale where it takes Picard being abducted in order for Riker to finally step forward. He then has to kill the man that played a huge part in bringing him up as a commanding officer.


So yeah, this season has always been my favorite of TNG's.
post #5534 of 5563
post #5535 of 5563

No surprise, really. I'm still kind of stunned that they actually did it for TNG.

post #5536 of 5563
We've lost a lot from the decline of home video. The peak of DVDs was a something of golden age, I think, where there was a serious financial incentive to come up with the best, most extensive packages possible for film and tv. It's sad that some series have probably missed their window to be converted to HD.
post #5537 of 5563

Personally, I don't have a problem watching a show in its original broadcast format. There's such a thing as too much detail. On the TOS Blus, I can't stop looking for the blend on Spock's ears.

post #5538 of 5563

But hey, anytime MGM wants to remaster the original Outer Limits they've got my dollar.

post #5539 of 5563

At least part of that article is flat out incorrect.  There's a great article on TrekCore where they interview Robert Bonchune, who worked at Foundation as Senior CG Supervisor on all three post-TNG series.

 

http://trekcore.com/blog/2013/05/deep-space-nine-in-high-definition-one-step-closer/

 

The TL:DR is that all the raw 3D scene and object files still exist, ready to be re-rendered at HD, and because the CG models needed to be able to handle various levels of close-up they were all detailed well past what was required for the original SD renders.

 

The article above includes several elements he re-rended as proof.

 

Later, elements were supplied to a volunteer composite artist to re-create a test sequence- here it is from YouTube...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OzWMOi5tyQs

 

There would still be work to be done with particle and explosion elements, and compositing them all together to match the original version- but they would not need to "start from scratch" with the effects.

post #5540 of 5563
Thread Starter 
I think it all depends on if enough of the original files were kept that they wouldn't need to recreate all of them from scratch. Many different F/X houses worked on the shows, so you hope they all took the same measures to preserve their work, or at least are preserved by companies that bought them out.
post #5541 of 5563
Thread Starter 
"Spock's Brain" is on BBC America.

Better than INTO DARKNESS.
post #5542 of 5563
If you remove your own brain you might believe that.
post #5543 of 5563
Thread Starter 
I believe it, because there's no single tear scene.
post #5544 of 5563
Touché.
post #5545 of 5563

Randomly watched Deep Space Nine Episode "Inquisition" last night. Dr Bashir is suspected of being a Dominion Double Agent. StarFleet sends WILLIAM SADLER to find out the truth. 


The truth has some interesting twists that I won't spoil, except to say this episode starts as a real cliche fest but really goes to an interesting place by the end. And we are introduced to Dept 31, the guys who've been doing the Federation's dirty work all along. 

post #5546 of 5563
Of all of the many bad STAR TREK: THE NEXT GENERATION episodes, "Sub Rosa" might be the worst.
post #5547 of 5563
Quote:
Originally Posted by Agentsands77 View Post

Of all of the many bad STAR TREK: THE NEXT GENERATION episodes, "Sub Rosa" might be the worst.

 

The only real response to this is probably Zak Handlen's 2011 AV Club recap... I could quote it in selected pieces, but really... you have to read the entire thing for it's amazing break down. Man, I miss those reviews.
 

Quote:

“Sub Rosa” (season 7, episode 14; first aired January 29, 1994)

Or The One Where Ugh. Just Ugh.

 

All right, this one hurt. So it’s time to switch back to my favorite coping mechanism, the note-based review. Here are (with annotations and a few minor corrections) my thoughts as jotted down while watching “Sub Rosa.” The screams from a damned soul are implied.

 

Crusher’s grandmother’s funeral
We open in a cemetery, as Beverly gives a eulogy for a woman we’ve never heard mentioned before, Felisa “Nana” Howard. It’s an idyllic scene, in that it’s obviously a set modeled to look like something out of The Quiet Man, and there isn’t anything immediately unsettling about it. The episode should have started with Patrick Stewart in front of a red curtain, warning us that the hour to follow would feature scenes not fit for human consumption. A real missed opportunity there.

 

A handsome man drops a camellia on the coffin, and gives Beverly a sexy look. Strap in!
At this point, I like to think I was still laughing with the episode, not at it. Still, this the first official warning sign that we’re leaving behind science fiction, and heading into Lifetime Original Movie territory.

 

Picard and Governor Maturin get us up to speed on the colony.
Caldos—terraforming project
The place was built to look like the Scottish highlands.

 

Okay, so I was a little premature in the Quiet Man reference; this is Scottish, not Irish. There’s something very old-school Trek about the effort to recreate a familiar Earth environment, and it adds to the feeling, throughout the episode, that this is really just someone’s attempt to shoehorn their favorite genre into a series that can’t support it. (Although really, “Sub Rosa” gets so bad you can’t really blame it on genre problems.)

They walk over and stand in front of a fence. Seriously?
The blocking here isn’t very good, is what I’m saying.

 

“Your grandmother had remarkable green eyes.” Troi says this like it’s the greatest miracle of the world.
I’m sure the eyes are impressive, and I’m also sure Troi is just trying to find something nice to say, but really, this line is only here to set up for a payoff later in the episode. If you hear this and don’t immediately think, “I wonder when Beverly’s eyes will turn green,” you should probably watch more scary movies.

 

Nana raised Beverly after her mother died.
A magic candle. 
Oh, “Sub Rosa,” you can pretend all you like that this has a rational explanation, but I know a damn magic candle when I see one.

 

Beverly deals with her grief by randomly pawing through her grandmother’s stuff.
I’m being mean here, I think—anyone visiting the home of a recently deceased, much beloved relative would be interested in a bit of snooping. But this goes on for a while, and, like much of the episode, it’s awkward. Like maybe someone is trying to build suspense, but doesn’t quite grasp how to go about it.

 

Of course there’s a journal.
Because of course there is.

 

Old guy just wanders in and blows the candle out. Beverly is upset.
Ned Quint, the creepy caretaker. “Ach, there’s lots of things she dinna talk about!” PS There’s a death curse.
If you haven’t seen any of the early Friday The 13th movies, this won’t mean much to you, but Ned Quint is a Crazy Ralph stand-in, the elderly nutter who likes to wander in at the beginning of the movie and tell everyone they’re doomed, DOOOOOOOMED. Much like Crazy Ralph, Our Ned can neither clearly articulate the reasoning behind his warning, nor is he able to express himself in a way which is not deeply creepy and/or annoying. Also like Ralph, Ned isn’t long for this world. 

I’m also curious as to why he’s so worked up here. Nana died after passing the century mark, and there’s never any indication that her association with Tall, Dark, and Spectral had a visibly negative effect on her. I get that we’re supposed to think it did, but for all we know, she spent her autumn years having ghost sex and died mid-orgasm. (Sorry for that image.)

 

The Governor hanging out with Data and Geordi in Engineering. Worried about the “caber toss.” 
GET IT? IT’S RUSTIC. (Oh, and something something Caldos has some problems in its weather-control systems.)

 

Nana was 100 years old and was nailing a guy in his 30s, Ronin.
Beverly and Deanna both think this is tops. I’ll just move on. It gets worse.

 

The candle comes back to light. And a ghost starts stripping Beverly. Wow.
Keep going.

“He knew exactly how I liked to be touched.” Oh sweet God.
I know. But keep going.

OH MY GOD. She fell asleep reading about her grandmother nailing a guy, and she considers this “erotic.” 
This. Oh lord, this. I guess attitudes are a lot more cavalier in the future about sex and so forth, which is great, but the idea of Beverly reading her grandmother’s account of hot, December-Dawn of Time romance in bed, and, y’know, getting off on this, is far more terrifying than any of the intentional scares this episode has to offer. Nana basically raised Beverly as her own child, which means she’s closer to Beverly’s mother. If I found a secret stash of my dad’s pornographic recollections, I’d burn the site, salt the earth, and never speak to him again. But maybe that’s just me.

 

A bunch of new flowers appear on the grave. And flashing green light. Gardening Tommyknockers!
[Obligatory Stephen King reference]

Problems with the weather-control system.
One of the (many) goofy elements of “Sub Rosa” is the way it keeps throwing in sci-fi elements while Beverly is off at the Spooky Sexcapades. If anything, these signs drag the episode down even farther. Ronin and his seduction attempts are awful, but they’re mesmerizingly, hilariously awful. The sci-fi stuff is, by comparison, tame and rather half-assed. (Although the two plots come together gloriously in the climax. Oh God, I said “climax.”)

 

Beverly goes home. There are flowers and shaking mirrors.
Ghost seduction, step one: Poltergeists are hot.

I think Beverly just orgasmed on screen. Oh lord.
See Step One.

“I love you Beverly. Just as I loved Felisa before you.”
Born in 1647 in Glasgow on Earth, first fell in love with Jessel Howard, has been haunting-and-nailing her descendants ever since.
This isn’t romantic. How is this romantic? “Your mom was hot, as was her mom before her, and her mom’s mom, and so forth. You are now part of the great chain. The great chain of me fog-banging red-heads till their eyes turn green.”

 

I think Beverly is orgasming through this entire exposition scene.
Oddly, this doesn’t make the scene more fun to watch. It just makes me feel bad for her. Really, how is this not rape? And yet it’s played for romance, even with the spookiness. The romantic genre often exploits unsettling gender politics for fantasy purposes, but the “have cake/eat too” strategy here is wrongheaded and insulting. Ronin uses his powers to bend Beverly to his will, and he’s still presented as a somewhat sympathetic figure, as though it would’ve been worth it to her to spend the remainder of her years camped out in the faux-Scottish countryside as the misty finger puppet of a being whose only interest in her is instinctual. Again: This isn’t romance, and all the gasps and wide-eyes and blowing wind won’t change that.

 

Poor, poor Gates McFadden. This is embarrassing.
Troi spends a lot of the episode hearing about Beverly’s adventures from the sidelines. I wonder if Marina Sirtis was gloating, just a little.

 

Back on the ship, Beverly seems perfectly fine. Because now she’s nailing a ghost.
This is such a weird jump. One scene, she’s terrified and wracked with ecstasy in her grandmother’s house, the next, she’s on the Enterprise, with nary a word about what happened. Is this mind control? Is she just so hot for the Grab-Ass Ghost that she’s willing to overlook her doubts? Not a clue.

 

“I’m not seeing anybody.” Literally!
Past Zack, you are one funny son of a bitch.

 

This is basically just a direct-to-video erotic thriller with all the skin edited out. 
You’re also very insightful. Are you seeing anyone?

 

Ground fog on the bridge. “It just sort of rolled in on us, sir.” 
Confession: this made me laugh.

 

Ned, the comical ethnic stereotype, tries to shut down the weather-control system, dies.
What? How did he—what was he—but if he knew enough to know the weather-control system was a threat, why wouldn’t he just tell—screw it. Don’t care.

 

Energy residual. Ew. He was killed by ghost discharge.
[Slowly backs away]

 

Ronin shows up in the flesh and gropes Beverly. “I need you to help me.”
Ah, and now we have Ronin in the flesh. Who looks like basically every other male dreamboat on the show, excluding Billy Campbell—a perfect marriage of father figure and sensitive artist, with a dash of stern violin instructor. And the high forehead just means his hairline recedes from the intensity of his eyes.

 

“I can’t do it for long.” Well, there goes the dream-lover status.
Ooo, good burn, Past Zack. Temporal paradox high five!

 

He wants the candle lit again. This is embarrassing.
I actually don’t remember exactly why I thought this was embarrassing, but I have faith in Past Zack. Besides, if embarrassment was riches, “Sub Rosa” would be the 1 percent.

They’re not even kissing! They’re just mouthing at each other!
Love In The Time Of The Junior High School Dance: Passion Never Dies, Is Also A Little Icky

 

Back on the Enterprise, Beverly lights the candle, and is clearly, very nervous and excited and this is so weird. 
Speaking of junior high, Beverly acts like a teenager really, really, really hoping that guy in her chemistry class wasn’t just screwing with her when he asked for her phone number. I’ll give “Sub Rosa” credit that at this point we’re supposed to find this unsettling, but it’s still painfully campy, and insulting to the character. Troi is the only other person on the show I can think of who was this thoroughly mind-screwed. (Riker was brainwashed by the Game, but he was never this subservient, which is telling, and more than a little sad. Apparently, the TNG folks think “romance” for the ladies is “desperation to please a man.”)

 

“I’m going to be part of you Beverly, would you like that?” “Yes, more than anything.” 
If Beverly had turned into the Gatekeeper at this point, I would’ve give “Sub Rosa” so many A pluses.

Beverly wants to quit Starfleet, stay on Caldos, dedicate her life to ghost-fucking.
And they say The American Dream is dead.

 

Geordi and Data in the graveyard at night, looking for an energy rating concentrated on Felisa’s grave.
I suppose Past Zack should’ve kept more specific notes about the actual plot, but I think we should all be grateful he was still awake. The cocaine budget for TV Club reviewers is lower than you’d think.

 

“Oh, Ronin.” 
Again, don’t remember this part. Just going to assume another orgasm here.

 

Picard comes by, sees Beverly orgasming lightly by the fire. 
I was right! Also, ugh. (Note: This is where a solid “Are you the Keymaster?” would’ve really saved the day.)

 

Ronin killed Felisa. He attacks Picard. This is terribly exciting.
You can assume the “exciting” is sarcastic.

 

Picard sends Beverly after Ronin. Why? Wouldn’t he know that’s dangerous? 
Here’s where the episode’s attempts to be a sort of gothic mystery really fall down. Picard knows Ronin is dangerous, considering that Ronin just nearly killed him. He also knows that Beverly is at least somewhat under the creature’s sway. The logical thing would be to call up to the Enterprise, have a security team beam down to escort her to the cemetery. Sure, it might not have helped, but at least it would’ve made more sense than a solo mission. But because the story requires Beverly to confront Ronin alone, nobody plays it smart.

 

Ronin JUST INHABITED FELISA’S CORPSE! AND THEN SHE KNOCKS OUT DATA AND GEORDI! THERE AREN’T ENOUGH CAPITAL LETTERS IN THE WORLD FOR THIS SHIT!
I’m not going to lie. This was pretty amazing.

 

“There’s no such thing as a ghost. You are some kind of anaphasic life form!” Wow, sci-fi tech doesn’t make for a good dramatic reveal.
I’m also not sure how important the distinction is, although I guess it gives Beverly the courage to fight back.

Beverly, BLOW OUT THE DAMN CANDLE. How stupid ARE YOU?
She shoots it with a phaser. Okay, at least that wasn’t stupid.
I’m sorry Past Zack ever doubted you, Beverly. Although he does have a point—why didn’t you blow out the candle before you destroyed it? I hope it wasn’t just to milk the suspense; you can’t milk a dead cow. 

 

“Somehow he realized one of my ancestors had a biochemistry that was compatible with his energy matrix.” 
Oh, that old saw.

“Whatever else he might have done, he made her very happy.” 

 

Argh. Why this tagline? Why do we have to soften a ghost story? A rapist-ghost story? Because the point here is that he made her happy, Beverly. He made her, under false pretenses and without giving her a choice. Sure, he was some kind of crazy alien being that had to exploit something in the Howard DNA to maintain structural integrity, but that doesn’t make him a nice guy.

 

Final thoughts: This was bad. Let us never speak of it again.

Grade: D

post #5548 of 5563
That's great.
post #5549 of 5563
Thread Starter 
Nitpick on the review, but the grandma was mentioned in one episode before waaaay back in S1. I only note it because S7 seemed to be about dredging up long lost relatives for every character, whether mentioned in passing or totally made up. Riker's the only character that doesn't get that episode in the final season because he already got that back in S2.

In short, the writers ran out of ideas by S7.
post #5550 of 5563
Quote:
Originally Posted by 11thIndian View Post
 

At least part of that article is flat out incorrect.  There's a great article on TrekCore where they interview Robert Bonchune, who worked at Foundation as Senior CG Supervisor on all three post-TNG series.

 

http://trekcore.com/blog/2013/05/deep-space-nine-in-high-definition-one-step-closer/

 

The TL:DR is that all the raw 3D scene and object files still exist, ready to be re-rendered at HD, and because the CG models needed to be able to handle various levels of close-up they were all detailed well past what was required for the original SD renders.

 

The article above includes several elements he re-rended as proof.

 

Later, elements were supplied to a volunteer composite artist to re-create a test sequence- here it is from YouTube...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OzWMOi5tyQs

 

There would still be work to be done with particle and explosion elements, and compositing them all together to match the original version- but they would not need to "start from scratch" with the effects.


Even if the original models were lost, Star Trek fans are pretty nuts and you can find some extraordinarily detailed fan models that could be used pretty easily (you'd still have to recreate the camera moves and animate the ships, though. Thinking about it, it shouldn't be too hard to recreate the camera tracking off of the existing completed SD footage.)

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